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These times will always be approximate as it will vary a bit depending on the system, affects from nearby bodies (gravity wells) may cause slowdown on acceleration.

CLIENT DISTANCE MEASURED IN LIGHTYEARS



Every now and then, a Cmdr falls asleep in supercruise and wakes up to flashing red lights and a drained and shutdown ship on lifesupport. In really bad cases, the client may find himself lightyears from the mainstar. 

You can calculate an approximate time for distances measured in LY using this formular:

( distance in LY * 365d * 24h ) / 2001c  = hours of travel + rough estimate to account for acceleration to max speed.

Examples:


Client beacon is 0.1LY from mainstar:

(0.1 * 365 * 24) / 2001 = 0.44 hours (about 26 mins) +  45mins to account for acceleration = About  1 hour and 11 minutes to reach client

(adding a bit longer acceleration time on this "shorter" range, because topspeed won't be reached)


Client beacon is 0.2LY from mainstar:

(0.2 * 365 * 24) / 2001 = 0.87 hours (about 53 mins) +  30mins to account for accelerationAbout  1 hour and 23 minutes to reach client


Client beacon is 0.5LY from mainstar:

(0.5 * 365 * 24) / 2001 = 2.19 hours + ½ hour = About 2:40 to reach client


Client beacon is 2.5LY from mainstar. 

(2.5 * 365 * 24) / 2001 = 10.94 hours + ½ hourAbout 11½ hours to reach client



Going far distances in your ship will require quite a bit of fuel. It'd be advised to shutdown unneeded modules while travelling to extend your range, such as shields and anything else with a power consumption you might not require to continue supercruise. (obviously be careful not to accidentally shutdown your thrusters or frameshift drive and you'll still need your sensors active).

You can look at your fuel usage gauge to estimate how much fuel will be needed for the trip once you have an idea of how long it should take. For example running at 1.5t/h would make you need 12 tonnes fuel for an 8 hour supercruise, then add estimated limpets needed + enough fuel left to jump to nearest system. Note again, that you can likely get the usage down when turning off unneeded modules during the flight.

 

 

CLIENT DISTANCE MEASURED IN LIGHTSECONDS


 

SC DistanceTime from acceleration startSpeed reached
1000ls1:00 
5000ls2:20 
10kls2:50 
25kls3:50 
50kls5:00 
100kls6:25 
150kls7:30 
200kls8:30 
300kls10:121030c
400kls11:451130c
500kls13:101205c
600kls14:201260c
700kls15:501325c
800kls17:021360c
900kls18:051409c
1000kls19:251445c
1100kls20:331477c
1200kls21:401500c
1300kls22:461530c
1400kls23:511560c
1500kls24:541585c
1600kls25:581607c
1700kls27:001627c
1800kls28:001648c
1900kls29:001667c
2000kls30:001685c
2250kls32:301725c
2500kls34:501762c
2750kls37:001792c
3000kls39:301824c

(Max. speed in supercruise is 2001c.)

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  1. Radlock did a similar thing a while back (see the supercruise transit times)- here's his spreadsheet https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/u/2/d/1JLOL9whwHTLKGoYdBgNyv2rdfoNl5XLmq7HzQqPyRxY/pubhtml# of course all this assumes the rat is starting from close into the star. Good tactics are to have the rat a little way out - 50ls and they'll instdrop if the clients close into the sun but being 150ls out from the star is if they could be close in and 200-500ls if you have a rough idea of the direction/want to be out of the gravity well a bit is a good plan (as you can see above moving close to the sun does the most damage in terms of time for distance), But unless you have a bearing you're trading off that you could be in the wrong direction, and the rat will then need to judge how close to the star to go.... so optimising it all is pretty complicated!